Why do people hate sardines? - All Access Sporting News
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Updated February 16, 10:33 AM CT

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Join me in support of sardines

03/16/2018

Why do people hate sardines?

So I posted this pic on FB and the majority of my friends were a hard "no" on sardines. They are not alone. A majority of Americans, according to my unscientific poll, reject the idea of even sampling the protein-rich food source. I'm asking that you give them a chance. But not indoors... or around other people. Chef Will Springfield was the lone supporter of sardines.

Venture capitalist and entrepreneur Craig Cooper, the millionaire co-founder of telecommunications company Boost Mobile (USA) says he "eats five cans of sardines every day to maintain his health and energy."

"Sardines are the No. 1 superfood for guys," said Cooper, who co-hosts CNBC's reality pitch series "Adventure Capitalists." "They're a powerhouse of nutrition, so I'm kind of an evangelist for sardines amongst everyone I meet."

Sardines and are named after the small Italian island of Sardinia and are smoked or cooked, then canned in oil and eaten whole. Right now I'm digging the ones in EVOO with jalapenos.

A 1-cup serving of sardines contains around 300 calories, over 20 grams of protein, and are a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins B, B12, and D, calcium, potassium, iron, and selenium. They do have around 400 mg of sodium, but that's not bad for canned food. The daily limit of sodium is 2,300 milligrams for healthy adults and 1,500 milligrams for individuals with heart disease.

Fat

A can of sardines, which is equal to about 3.75 ounces, contains 10.53 grams of fat, but only 1.4 grams are saturated. The rest of the fat in a can of sardines is healthy unsaturated fat, which can help lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of heart disease. The omega-3 fatty acids in sardines reduce inflammation. Chronic inflammation elevates your risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cancer and arthritis, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Omega-3 fatty acids support memory and proper brain function as well.

How to eat them

First off, don't examine them too closely. You're likely to get grossed-out before you even start. The simplest way to eat sardines is to put them on a cracker, top with some chopped red onion, and a thin slice of jalapeno.

Enjoy!


Ran DeBord ~ All Access Sporting News  



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